Finance 101: Cracking the Jargon of Wall Street

Wall Street is infamously indecipherable. Arbitrage, small firm effect, reversion to mean: these terms are thrown around all the time by finance-savvy journalists, bankers, and professors, but it’s easy to gloss over what exactly they mean. Yet, understanding these terms remains crucial to analyzing the current market and predicting future trends of the financial world…. Read more »

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  • TooBigThumbnailAIG to Taxis: The Evolution of “Too Big to Fail”

    By Vineeta Reddy During the financial crisis in 2009, many believed that firms like AIG were “Too Big to Fail”. Such companies had such high stakes in the market and controlled the money of so many individuals that their collapse would have meant further decline of the economy, something that the US could not have... Read more »

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  • ChinaThumbnailProfessor Elizabeth Bogan on GE, China, and Bonds

    What are the ramifications of GE withdrawing from the financial industry? GE should get out of the finance business. There were diseconomies of scale for GE trying to handle an industrial empire and a financial one. There are other financial institutions that can pick up their finance businesses. The Financial Times reported on Sunday, April... Read more »

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    Economic Impact of the Syrian Refugee Crisis on Host Nations

    By Trevor Nesse ’18 Since the tumultuous series of events known collectively as the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya transpired in 2011, protests in Syria have have resulted in military intervention on behalf of President Assad’s government. As the nation fragmented into a plethora of factions including Assad supporters, rebel groups, ethnic groups,… Read more »

  • Private Equity 101

    Private Equity 101

    By Lillian Wu ’19 At times it feels like the investing world randomly creates terms like “proprietary transaction,” “broken auction,” and “control leveraged buyout” simply to watch those not so well-versed in the language of finance flounder in a haze of confusion. But never fear! On April 21, Princeton graduates Steve Brownlie ’97 and Greg… Read more »

  • OBOR

    OBOR: How China is Redefining its Role for the “New Normal”

    Originating as an idea within China’s commerce ministry intended to decrease overcapacity in China’s steel and manufacturing sectors, China’s “One Belt, One Road” (OBOR) program has evolved into a cornerstone of Xi Jiping’s economic strategy and foreign policy. By establishing a modern incarnation of the dynamic trade network that once directed a thriving trade between… Read more »

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    Debating the Economic Impacts of Climate Change

    By Abhiram Karuppur ’19 In December 2015, world leaders, leading scientists, policy makers, and activists convened in Paris for the United Nations Climate Change Conference, or COP21, to draft a plan to combat climate change. In the Paris Agreement drafted at the conference,  several countries agreed to set targets for emissions reduction and increase funding for… Read more »

  • Julie Silcock '78

    Profile: Julie Silcock

    By Betty Liu ’19 Since graduating from Princeton, Julie Silcock ’78, has made quite the name for herself in the world of finance. Silcock is currently a Managing Director at Houlihan Lokey , an international investment bank and one of the top M&A advisors for US transactions, in the Southwest and Southeast regions of the U.S. Previously, she was… Read more »

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    Big Banks and the Repeal of Glass-Steagall

    Two weeks ago, Citigroup’s former CEO John Reed said in an op-ed in The Financial Times that big banks are “inherently unstable and unworkable.” In his opinion, the Glass-Steagall Act should not have been repealed in 1999. The two biggest flaws he pointed out were that big banks have bad culture and are not more… Read more »

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    Funding for Alternative Energy Tightens

    One year ago, renewable energy companies and ETFs were on an upswing. There was an increase in the price of oil, and companies like Tesla were attracting more and more customers. Many people predicted that it would only be a matter of time before the oil and gas industry collapsed and alternative energy companies took… Read more »

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    Professor Elizabeth Bogan on GE, China, and Bonds

    What are the ramifications of GE withdrawing from the financial industry? GE should get out of the finance business. There were diseconomies of scale for GE trying to handle an industrial empire and a financial one. There are other financial institutions that can pick up their finance businesses. The Financial Times reported on Sunday, April… Read more »

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    China’s Real Estate Industry: Has the Bubble Burst?

    Despite the general unease towards China’s real estate industry, an unease that centered on speculation that the rising property prices and sustained building boom in China were contributing to the creation of a burgeoning property bubble within the country, international investors in the past few years have zealously poured money into the Chinese real estate… Read more »

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    Capital Controls in Cyprus, Ukraine, and Iceland

    By Shuyang Li Capital controls lay under some of the largest economic stories of the recession, painted by many as key indicators of the magnitude of the economic mires the global economy suffered. Recently Iceland, Ukraine, and Cyprus have reportedly considered lifting capital controls, a sign of confidence in their markets. The start of the… Read more »